City of Las Vegas

Building Community To Make Life Better

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The city’s Department of Detention and Enforcement participated in the 15th Annual Nevada Law Enforcement Officers’ Memorial Run today. Deputy Chief Michael Brown ran the first leg. The annual Memorial Run is a means to bring honor and recognition to National Police Memorial Week and all Nevada law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty. The department also participated in Leg 7 of the Run and had 36 runners in attendance. This years’ Memorial Run starts in Southern Nevada and travels to Carson City, with each leg carrying a baton that is engraved with the names of 121 Peace Officers who have fallen in the line of duty.

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Do Aliens Exist? They do at City Hall.

The “Little Green Men” art exhibit currently on display in the Chamber Gallery at City Hall aims to honor, what else, Nevada’s extraterrestrial roots! Many southern Nevadans and people around the world can’t get enough of wondering what is in outer space. The works of art, shown in the photos below, give some creative life to those long-standing rumors.

Two City of Las Vegas employees are even featured in this gallery. Margaret DeClerk, a graphic artist, and Steve Horlock, A/V Production Specialist in KCLV, shared some of their inspiration with us.



In her piece, Margaret wanted to “evoke the mysterious side of the subject, the unknown and speculative nature.” “For centuries, people have tried to pass off sightings as natural phenomenon, such as ‘swamp gas.’ I titled my painting ‘Swamp Gas My AS$’ because some insist that what they have witnessed was other-worldly, not natural to earth. They want to be taken seriously, that they actually saw something that could only be explained as ‘extra terrestrial.’” Margaret’s acrylic paint canvas took about 35-40 hours to complete.

Why did Steve want to be part of the “Little Green Men” exhibit? “We are so close to Area 51 and the extraterrestrial highway and there are many people I have talked with that feel they have had personal experiences with some other form of life.” Steve’s inspiration came from researching 1950s science fiction culture. “I watched a ton of movies I found and also looked through a few books I had in my library that cover behind the scenes props and costume design from all these old movies. There was a common theme in the movie posters which involved a woman in the arms of the creature or robot from space. I also saw features of the creatures that where common and I used a few of them to design my alien.” His painting is a mixture of acrylic and oil paint on canvas. 

You can check out this new gallery on the second floor of City Hall, Monday-Thursday from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

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Tyrone McDougald was about as low as he could go on Dec. 10, 2012 after his 15th arrest for petty crimes in Las Vegas. “I was homeless and in throes of drug addiction,” McDougald said. “At the time I didn’t even want to get clean, I just didn’t want to go to jail.”

While McDougald, 50, felt he had hit bottom he was actually taking the first step to recovery thanks to being referred to Municipal Court Judge Heidi Almase’s HOPE Court. HOPE Court, or the Habitual Offender Prevention and Education court, is an alternative sentencing program designed to give a second chance to habitual offenders with issues related to homelessness, misdemeanor criminal activity and substance abuse addictions.

McDougald is one of seven new graduates of HOPE Court who were honored this afternoon at a graduation ceremony and reception at the Regional Justice Center, located at 200 Lewis Ave.

McDougald participated in the program and was assisted by the Salvation Army and Beacon of Hope.

“It was when I was a patient at the Salvation Army that I really had a paradigm shift where I decided I wanted to deal with my issues,” McDougald said. “The program was really an open door for me. Hope Court saved my life.

The program finds housing for the participants and requires them to complete drug treatment, counseling, job readiness and life-skill courses. Every defendant must stay out of trouble and abstain from drugs and alcohol during the program.

“I’ve been in the same apartment for two years and drug free for 19 months; that is unprecedented in my life outside of when I’ve been incarcerated” McDougald said. 

“Hope Court is a tremendous program. The people running it are a dynamic force, and they are helping many people in the community.”

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Mayor Goodman Celebrates Passover

Tonight is the beginning of the eight day festival of Passover, and the city of Las Vegas extends best wishes to all those in our community celebrating the holiday.

Many city family members celebrate Passover including Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman. For the mayor it is a time to be with family and celebrate the Jewish traditions, but it also a time when she finds herself doing a lot of cooking.

“On Sunday night I did all my cooking prep,” Mayor Goodman said. “I did the brisket and chicken and all the prep work.”

Sunday night is also when she makes haroset, a traditional dish made with chopped apples, pecans or walnuts, cinnamon, sugar and Passover wine. Another dish the mayor prepares the night before is gefilte fish, a combination of ground up whitefish and carp mixed with spices and served cold.

Today the cooking continued with homemade matzah ball soup, salad, and vegetables.

The Goodman’s also set an extra place at the table with an extra glass of wine for the return of the Old Testament prophet Elijah.

Before dinner the Goodman’s read from the Haggadah, telling the story of the Passover and the rescuing the Israelites from slavery.

The mayor has her four children and their families over for Passover. Another tradition that they practice is the finding of the Afikomen. The mayor’s grandchildren will search for a piece of matzah that is wrapped in a cloth and hidden.

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Special Earth Day Farmer’s Market at City Hall

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In an effort to create a more sustainable community this Earth Day, the city of Las Vegas is hosting its first ever Farmer’s Market at City Hall on Wednesday, April 16. The market will be held during the City Council meeting, so guests may partake in both the meeting and the market or get a few fresh, organic items on their way home. The event is open to the public and begins at 8:30 a.m. and will be open until 1 p.m.

More than 15 vendors will be present with a wide variety of organic fruits, vegetables and herbs, the market is curated by Kerry Clasby, the Intuitive Forager who organizes the Downtown 3rd Farmer’s Market each Friday. Local honey, a mainstay for some allergy sufferers, will be available in both liquid form and honeycomb. Artisans will be on hand with their handmade creations of jewelry, scarves and many more artistic items. A vegan bakery, kettle corn, fresh pasta and gourmet sauces will also be on hand. In addition there will be a kids craft center and chef demonstrations for those who want a few tips on cooking up their items.

So come over to city hall and support the local economy just by purchasing a few nutritious locally grown products that you are sure to enjoy and celebrate Earth Day! 

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More Past Offenders Graduate from HOPE Court Program

​Tyrone McDougald was about as low as he could go on Dec. 10, 2012 after his 15th arrest for petty crimes in Las Vegas.

​“I was homeless and in throes of drug addiction,” McDougald said. “At the time I didn’t even want to get clean, I just didn’t want to go to jail.”

While McDougald, 50, felt he had hit bottom he was actually taking the first step to recovery thanks to being referred to Municipal Court Judge Heidi Almase’s HOPE Court. HOPE Court, or the Habitual Offender Prevention and Education court, is an alternative sentencing program designed to give a second chance to habitual offenders with issues related to homelessness, misdemeanor criminal activity and substance abuse addictions.
McDougal is one of seven new graduates of HOPE Court who were honored this afternoon at a graduation ceremony and reception at the Regional Justice Center, located at 200 Lewis Ave.

McDougald participated in the program and was assisted by the Salvation Army and Beacon of Hope.

"It was when I was a patient at the Salvation Army that I really had a paradigm shift where I decided I wanted to deal with my issues,” McDougald said. “The program was really an open door for me. Hope Court saved my life.”
The program finds housing for the participants and requires them to complete drug treatment, counseling, job readiness and life-skill courses. Every defendant must stay out of trouble and abstain from drugs and alcohol during the program.

​“I’ve been in the same apartment for two years,” McDougald said. “I’ve been drug free for 19 months, and that is unprecedented in my life outside of when I’ve been incarcerated.
“Hope Court is a tremendous program. The people running it are a dynamic force, and they are helping many people in the community.”

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Las Vegas Mayor Carolyn G. Goodman, other local elected officials and private citizens have been working to improve the lives of our veterans. They recently sent a letter to members of the congressional delegation on areas they thought could use some attention. This effort is part of the Civilian Military Council of Southern Nevada.

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The city of Las Vegas’ Environmental Compliance Section has been participating in Earth Day public outreach events for 24 years, and will again this Saturday, April 12, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the UNLV Campus. There is free admission and parking.

The focus of the city’s outreach is educating the public on illicit discharges to the sanitary sewer and storm drain.  This year’s valley-wide Earth Day event, GREENFest, is the largest event of its kind in the valley. 

The city’s Office of Sustainability staff will also be participating at GREENFest by spreading the word about the city’s sustainability initiatives.  For the city of Las Vegas, sustainability is more than just being “green” – it is a way to ensure that current and future generations will enjoy a high quality of life through energy, water, and recycling projects that will make it America’s first net zero city.

Stop by the Environmental Compliance booth to learn what you can do to protect the valley’s waterways! For more information visit http://www.thinkenergystar.com/greenfest.

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The city is assisting with the 2014 Warrior Games selection events this week. The games allow wounded warriors with the United States Air Force the opportunity to compete in sporting events including cycling, shooting, archery, sitting volleyball, wheelchair basketball and track and field. More than 100 warriors have been competing at events including a swim meet at the UNLV MPE McDermott Buildings Pool and a track meet at Rancho High School.

 

“The best part of the week is the athletes in the track, field and swimming competition will qualify for the USA Paralympic team if their times are good enough,” said Cindy Moyes with the city’s Park, Recreation and Neighborhood Services Department. “Each of those events have USA officials present this week. In addition, the experience has been positive for the athletes and the events at Rancho High School brought awareness to the students/ classes that came to watch the track events.”

 

The city has a phenomenal Adaptive Recreation Division, which provides community-based therapeutic recreation services for residents to become and to stay active in the community. Individuals of all ages and ability levels can take part in a variety of recreational activities to enrich their leisure time. The city is part of the Paralympic Sports Club of Las Vegas, a community partnership between the city of Las Vegas and the Clark County School District.

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City Council Approves Tentative 2015 Budget

The Las Vegas City Council today approved the city’s Tentative Budget for Fiscal Year 2015, which begins July 1. The goal for this upcoming budget is to avoid reductions in service to the public, to staff a new fire station and a city jail isolation unit that is opening, to increase funding to Metro Police by 5.8 percent, and to support the City Council’s strategic priorities.

The new budget calls for 51 new and restored positions, including 30 in the area of public safety. The budget proposes total expenditures of $498.4 million, a majority which are in salary and benefits. The budget proposes revenues of $489.3 million. Revenues are expected to increase by 4.8 percent over last year thanks to the Consolidated Tax performing well. Revenue enhancements of $7 million were also made possible due to an increase in several areas, including medical transports and other fee increases. This leaves the council with a budget shortfall and it is something that will need to be addressed moving forward.

The final budget hearing will be at 10 a.m. May 20 in council chambers, where residents will have another opportunity to provide input.